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Sicalis flaveola


Sicalis flaveola
Información de la foto
Copyright: Jose Reynaldo da Fonseca (nofer) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1190 W: 366 N: 811] (2307)
Género: Animals
Medio: Color
Tomada el: 2015-11-30
Categorías: Birds
Cámara: Sony DSC-F828, Carl Zeiss - 28 - 200mm f2-2,2, Memory Stick PRO 8GB, S&K Polarizer 58 mm
Exposición: f/2, 8 segundos
Map: [view]
Versión de la foto: Versión original
Tema(s): Canary, Yellow Birds, Birds of South America I, Birds of Brazil II [view contributor(s)]
Fecha enviada: 2015-12-03 9:35
Vista: 2061
Puntos: 3
[Normas para las notas] Notas del fotógrafo [Portugués]
The saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola) is a tanager from South America that is common in open and semi-open areas in lowlands outside the Amazon Basin. They have a wide distribution in Colombia, northern Venezuela (where it is called "canario de tejado" or "roof canary"), western Ecuador, western Peru, eastern and southern Brazil (where it is called "canário da terra" or "native canary"), Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, northern Argentina, and Trinidad and Tobago. It has also been introduced to Hawaii, Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Although commonly regarded as a canary, it is not related to the Atlantic canary. Formerly, it was placed in the Emberizidae but it is close to the seedeaters. The male is bright yellow with an orange crown which distinguishes it from most other yellow finches (the exception being the orange-fronted yellow finch). The females are more confusing and are usually just a slightly duller version of the male, but in the southern subspecies S. f. pelzelni they are olive-brown with heavy dark streaks.

Typically nesting in cavities, the saffron finch makes use of sites such as abandoned rufous hornero (Furnarius rufus) nests, bamboo branches and under house roofs - this species is tolerant of human proximity, appearing at suburban areas and frequenting bird tables. They have a pleasant but repetitious song which, combined with their appearance, has led to them being kept as caged birds in many areas. Males are polygamous, mating with two females during the nesting season, and territorial, which has led to the species being used for blood sporting with two males put in a cage in order to fight. (informações da Wikipedia en).


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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • lousat Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5848 W: 89 N: 14956] (62731)
  • [2015-12-03 11:13]

Hi Jose,i must to be honest,the quality of this pic is very god talking about colors and exposure,but the sharpness is a bit soft.No problem.Nobody is perfect and the pos about this nice specie is useful and interesting.Have a nice evening and thanks,Luciano

  • Good 
  • PeterZ Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5089 W: 166 N: 13026] (48524)
  • [2015-12-03 11:51]

Hello Jose,
Not the best quality. Two tips: Try to focus on the eye of the bird and make the photo as much as you can on eye level, so a much lower point of view. Success.
Regards,
Peter

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